Chrome will now warn you if your password’s been stolen as soon as you type it in

Chrome will now warn you if your password's been stolen as soon as you type it in

Unless you’re a super conscientious internet user with password managers and two-factor authentication out the wazoo, it’s highly likely you’re still using a couple of logins that have been compromised in data breaches. 

You know you should use unique passwords for everything all the time, you’ve checked HaveIBeenPwned.com when you read about a major data breach, changed your Gmail or Facebook password when prompted — but ultimately you’ve kind of accepted a certain amount of regular pwnage as a fact of your digital life.

Now, Google has announced that Chrome will make it a bit easier to clean up your compromised credentials as you find them. Read more…

More about Google Chrome, Password Security, Tech, and Cybersecurity

We need to talk about that ridiculous Congressional hearing on encryption

We need to talk about that ridiculous Congressional hearing on encryption

If one thing was made clear today, it’s that Congress is woefully unequipped to be debating encryption and backdoors for law enforcement with the major tech giants. But that surely didn’t stop them from doing so anyway!

On Tuesday, the Senate Committee on the Judiciary held a hearing titled “Encryption and Lawful Access: Evaluating Benefits and Risks to Public Safety and Privacy.”

In plain speak, the Congressional hearing was about big tech’s security protocols to protect your personal data and the police’s frustration in not being able to access that data.

Apple’s Manager of User Privacy, Erik Neuenschwander, and Facebook’s Product Management Director for Privacy and Integrity in Messenger, Jay Sullivan, were both on the panel representing their respective employers. Both of these privacy professionals explained (numerous times) how each of their products worked. They patiently walked through how, in some cases, it’s literally impossible for Apple and Facebook to provide information to law enforcement because the companies themselves don’t have access to the information in question either. Read more…

More about Facebook, Apple, Politics, Encryption, and Congressional Hearing

A $722 million ‘too big to fail’ crypto Ponzi scheme just failed miserably

A $722 million 'too big to fail' crypto Ponzi scheme just failed miserably

Just because you’re fraudulently raking in hundreds of millions of dollars doesn’t mean you have to be such a jerk about it. 

It’s clear no one passed this message along to the three men arrested today for their alleged part in a $722 million globe-spanning cryptocurrency Ponzi scheme. In a Dec. 10 press release from the Department of Justice, the men stand accused of a years-long effort to fool investors into believing they ran a bitcoin mining pool — all the while disparaging anyone stupid enough to believe their supposed lies.   

Starting in 2014, Matthew Brent Goettsche and Jobadiah Sinclair Weeks, both of Colorado, along with Joseph Frank Abel of California, allegedly ran BitClub Network — a service that promised to take investors’ money and put it toward mining cryptocurrency.  Read more…

More about Bitcoin, Scams, Blockchain, Cryptocurrency, and Tech

Exxon wins climate trial, but its battles have just started

Exxon wins climate trial, but its battles have just started

Oil behemoth Exxon won a big climate trial on Tuesday. 

But critically, while New York State Supreme Court judge Barry Ostrager found the company did not deceive investors about the risks posed by sinking money into future oil projects, Ostrager emphasized this doesn’t excuse Exxon from its role in warming the planet. 

“Climate science wasn’t on trial, and the judge acknowledged that,” said Carroll Muffett, a lawyer and president of the Center for International Environmental Law.

“Nothing in this opinion is intended to absolve ExxonMobil from responsibility for contributing to climate change through the emission of greenhouse gases in the production of its fossil fuel products,” wrote Ostrager. “ExxonMobil does not dispute either that its operations produce greenhouse gases or that greenhouse gases contribute to climate change. But ExxonMobil is in the business of producing energy, and this is a securities fraud case, not a climate change case.” Read more…

More about Science, Lawsuit, Climate Change, Exxon, and Science

Influencer planned violent domain-name heist to elevate his brand

Influencer planned violent domain-name heist to elevate his brand

Rossi Lorathio Adams II brought a gun to a domain name fight. 

The 27-year-old social media influencer was sentenced to 168 months in jail on Monday for a 2017 plot involving viral videos, a pantyhose-sporting henchman, a gun, and the rather asinine catchphrase “Do It For State.” 

Needless to say, things didn’t exactly work out the way the aspiring digital-media mogul hoped. 

The plot is detailed in a Dec. 9 press release from the Department of Justice. Adams, it seems, fancied himself an entrepreneur — he ran the social media company “State Snaps,” which he founded in 2015 while attending Iowa State University.  Read more…

More about Influencers, Tech, and Web Culture